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FGS Geologic Data

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The Florida Geological Survey holds multiple geologic collections including:

  • Wells and Exploratory Borehole Samples
  • Geophysical Logs
  • Hand Specimens
  • Thin Sections

Please see below for more information about each one and the data available.

Wells and Exploratory Boreholes

The FGS currently has two primary designations for boreholes within the database. The first is known as a "W number" and refers to a borehole for which we have samples (or had samples) stored in our repository. The second designation is a "Wgi number," which refers to a borehole that we have received geologic information about, but no samples. In the case that FGS receives samples for one of these boreholes, it then would receive a W number, which then would remain its primary designation. Currently, the information for boreholes with W numbers can be accessed through our Borehole Query Search or though our interactive Map Direct focus.

Geophysical Logs

The geophysical log collection consists of the various logs run on exploratory boreholes as well as water, injection, oil and gas, observation, and monitor wells throughout the state of Florida. The collection represents approximately 5,320 boreholes, some of which are also represented in the core and well cuttings sample collection. The physical geophysical log collection is currently stored in multiple file cabinets, organized by county. With grants through the USGS National Geological and Geophysical Data Preservation Program (NGGDPP), our geophysical logs were scanned and are now available online through our Geophysical Log Search. Additionally, logs for boreholes with W numbers can be accessed through our Borehole Query Search.

Hand Specimens

Hand specimens are part of what is called the "M Series." This growing collection includes samples from across Florida as well as other states and countries. These samples are not related to any borehole but are often taken to preserve geologic examples of formations, mineral types and outcrop lithology.

Thin Sections

Similar to hand specimens, thin sections are often taken to preserve geologic examples of formations, mineral types and outcrop lithology. Unlike hand specimens, though, thin sections are often associated to a specific borehole. This collection is not yet captured in the FGS geologic database.

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Last Modified:
April 28, 2018 - 4:27pm

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