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Karst Studies

Karst features are important in understanding surface water-groundwater interactions. Karst features include sinks, seeps, swallets and springs. Research in this area includes identifying recharge and discharge areas; investigating ground-water contribution to surface water via springs and seeps, including seepage of groundwater in coastal zones; support data collection and modeling efforts that address karst hydrogeologic settings; and quantify interactions for regulatory purposes. Recent FGS projects in this research area include:

Middle Suwannee Basin Spring Recharge Area Delineation

Alapaha River Swallets Dye Trace

FWC/DEP-FGS Big Bend Wildlife Management Areas Spring Inventory


Middle Suwannee Basin Spring Recharge Area Delineation

Contact: Tom Greenhalgh

The study included performing dye traces at Falmouth Spring and in the Little River Trace and installing flowmeters in four springs. The dye tracing established conduit connections between Falmouth Spring and Ellaville, Suwannacoochee, Lime Springs and Lime Sink Run. The two dyes introduced into swallets in the Little River Trace established conduit connections between Mearson, Troy and Little River Springs. Both traces showed the Suwannee River is not a potentiometric divide. Data from the flowmeters in Lafayette Blue, Peacock III, Convict and Hornsby Springs documented spring reversals and siphoning of flow from Peacock I and II into Peacock III for periods of months in duration.

The Florida Geological Survey provided the Suwannee River Water Management District with the final report for this study, and it is available upon request. Potential areas of contribution to flow for the first-magnitude springs Falmouth, Lafayette Blue and Troy Springs, and second-magnitude Peacock and Little River Springs were generated.


Alapaha River Swallets Dye Trace

Contact: Tom Greenhalgh

Dyes were introduced into Dead River and Tiger Creek swallets. Initial analytical data established conduit connections between the Dead River Swallet and Alapaha and Holton Creek Rises. Sampling for the Tiger Creek Swallet dye introduction is ongoing. The Florida Geological Survey will be providing the Suwannee River Water Management District with a final report for this study in the fall of 2016 and will be available upon request.

FWC/FDEP-FGS Big Bend Wildlife Management Areas Spring Inventory

Contact: Tom Greenhalgh

A pilot study to locate and catalog springs in the Big Spring Creek Unit of the Big Bend Wildlife Management Areas using available thermography data, LiDAR and field reconnaissance will begin in the fall of 2016. Planned data collection includes GPS locational information, field observations, estimates of discharge and photographs. Limited water quality sampling as well as field parameters are to be collect at some sites. The report for this study will be available upon request.

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Last Modified:
May 4, 2017 - 1:53pm

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